video

Interview with Dimitris Konstantakopoulos. Greek crisis

Dimitris Konstantakopoulos

Greeks stay in the streets for very simple reasons. After experiencing one year of “help” from EU, ECB, IMF and their own government, they strongly believe their nation is heading directly to an economic and social catastrophe of epic proportions. They see more and more old people searching for food in dustbins, hospitals and universities bending under the deduction of half of their budgets, more and more shops closed, the state in decomposition, twice as many people committing suicide compared to last year. Greek economy is experiencing its worst recession since the 2nd World War, the morale of the nation is broken. Greek society is entering rapidly a classic Weimar-type situation. Its possibility of repaying its debts has been annihilated, as a result of a program supposedly designed to achieve exactly the goal of repayment! 

 

Dugin speaks with Francis Fukuyama

When asked to contribute to this series on the future of conservatism, I hesitated because it seemed to me that in both the US and Europe what was most needed was not a new form of conservatism but rather a reinvention of the left. For more than a generation we have been under the sway of conservative ideas, against which there has been little serious competition. In the wake of the financial crisis and the rise of massive inequality, there should be an upsurge of leftwing populism, and yet some of the most energised populists both in the US and Europe are on the right. There are many reasons for this, but one of them is surely that publics around the world have very little confidence that the left has any credible solutions to our current problems.
The rise of the French Socialists and Syriza in Greece does not belie this fact; both are throwbacks to an old and exhausted left that will sooner rather than later have to confront the dire fiscal situation of their societies. What we need is a left that can stem the loss of rich-world middle class jobs and incomes through forms of redistribution that do not undermine economic growth.

Pages